SproutCore JavaScript Framework is Pushing for Standards Compliant Browsers [Best of June '08 #3]

Interesting posts this week (June 16-22 2008):

  • There was some buzz about SproutCore this week — YAJF (Yet Another JavaScript Framework) if you like, though this one comes with an application framework supporting the MVC (Model-View-Controller) design pattern. SproutCore, labeled by some as a Flash competitor, relies solely on web standards like HTML, CSS and JavaScript. In fact, the provided demos relies on elements of the forthcoming standards HTML5 and CSS3, currently supported by the Safari browser, but not by IE7, for example. However, standards compliance is always welcome, even if a bit ahead. Hopefully this can help to speed up the compliance efforts of the other browser vendors.
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  • Semantic search engine Hakia opens up their services to developers and provides an API. Free access to the search API is time limited "until the partners' quota is filled," as they write. The text analysing API, however, does not seem to be time limited and is free up to 1000 requests per day. Currently available for text analysis is the "Summarizer", which provides "a summary of a large text block or URL". Yet to come is the "Categorizer", "Characterizer" and "Text Meaning Representation (TMR)", which are additional semantic analysis tools.
    ReadWriteWeb tested the Summarizer API component, and weren't very impressed, writing: "Mostly, it seemed to just return the headline or first sentence as the summary for articles we threw at it."
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  • Lifehacker, featuring The How-To Geek explains a few tweaks how to make Windows Vista less annoying. Something for Microsoft to read and learn. I'm still using XP, though I'll probably shift to Vista in due course. I'd rather use Linux, but I'm afraid I'm too dependent on Microsoft-only tools and software.
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  • Ed Bott asks if we will be using petabyte-sized (1000 TB) disks in 2020. That's not unlikely if Moore's Law continue to hold. Historically hard disk capacity has increased 10 fold every 5 years. To get some perspective, Google processes over 20 petabytes of data per day. Around 2035, we will have exabyte (1000 PB) disks. That can still be useful, since in 2006 it was estimated that Internet users created 161 exabytes of new data, a number that is estimated to grow to around a zettabyte (1000 EB) in 2010. Next in turn storage devices are yottabyte (1000 ZB) disks, which can be expected around 2065, which is probably beyond my lifetime though.
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  • Josh Catone leaves RWW, sadly enough. He will always be remembered by this blog for his Web 3.0 posts though.
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